Hi! My name's Chris. I've lived in Los Angeles since 1995, when I came out here for grad school. I 'm originally from the north side of Columbus, OH.

I'm a creative writer and artist and have shown my work in galleries in Los Angeles. Check out my art here.

I've also written a graphic novel! You can check out some sample pages here.

I like graphic novels, Christmas, tide pools, grilled cheese sandwiches, reading, biker moustaches, dudes, football (Ohio State and the New Orleans Saints), sea monsters, painting, pine trees, bookstores, tennis, Chiddy Bang, going to the gym, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Cricket Magazine, gloves with the fingers torn off, the "Gemini's Twin" sketch on Saturday Night Live, Parks and Recreation, illustration, rugby players, Trina Schart Hyman, Stephen King, horror films, Hillary Clinton, film history and unexplained phenomena.

I blog about illustration, painting, Atari, Christmas, books, style...and things from my favorite era: the late 1970s/early 80s. As well as assorted other stuff!

Email: Cobbler3@yahoo.com
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CURRENTLY READING : Redeployment by Phil Klay

 

jockohomoremix:

Lost Andy Warhol Artworks Discovered on Amiga Floppies from the ’80s - First official rescue mission and subsequent unearthing of a contemporary artist’s work from an old computer (Amiga 1000). Thanks to the Carnegie Mellon University’s Computer Club and a team of artists, archivists and curators who were able to extract some of Warhol’s lost pixels into the physical world. I’m curious about the retrieval process which has been documented by a video crew from the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) and will be premiering as Trapped: Andy Warhol’s Amiga Experiments on May 10th at the museum. If you can’t make it to the burgh’ you can check out the documentary on its website starting May 12th. * Featured above, Andy Warhol with Debbie Harry at the 1985 Amiga Launch at Lincoln Center

jockohomoremix:

Lost Andy Warhol Artworks Discovered on Amiga Floppies from the ’80s - First official rescue mission and subsequent unearthing of a contemporary artist’s work from an old computer (Amiga 1000). Thanks to the Carnegie Mellon University’s Computer Club and a team of artists, archivists and curators who were able to extract some of Warhol’s lost pixels into the physical world. I’m curious about the retrieval process which has been documented by a video crew from the Carnegie Museum of Art (CMOA) and will be premiering as Trapped: Andy Warhol’s Amiga Experiments on May 10th at the museum. If you can’t make it to the burgh’ you can check out the documentary on its website starting May 12th.

* Featured above, Andy Warhol with Debbie Harry at the 1985 Amiga Launch at Lincoln Center